Fisher Price Blocks Flame Retardant Labeling Bill

Just as with efforts to label genetically modified ingredients, I knew that corporate push back to a new flame retardant labeling bill would be strong. But when I heard that Fisher Price was in opposition, I had to share.

The flame retardant labeling bill in questions, SB 763, is one of many from California State Senator Mark Leno, who has fought tirelessly to regulate toxic chemical flame retardants, which have been linked to cancer, infertility, birth defects and autism, among other health problems. And as we’ve seen time and time again, California’s stance on flame retardants often dictates policy for the rest of the country. The flame retardant labeling bill is up for a vote tomorrow!

So why would Fisher Price, and its trade group the Juvenile Products Manufacturers Association, oppose the flame retardant labeling bill? Whatever the reason, it’s not about kids’ safety and health.

That’s why I just signed the Center for Environmental Health’s new petition to ask Fisher Price and the JPMA to withdraw opposition to the bill. Because we parents deserve to know what’s in our children’s products!

What do you think? Will you sign the petition? Why or why not? Please tell me about it in comments, below. Thanks!

 

 

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Comments

  1. Hi Rachel,
    I am in nursing school and we are doing a “Toy Project” where our toy of choice is the Fisher Price Baby’s First Blocks. My assignment is to find out the toy construction quality which led me to your blog. I am having the hardest time finding any information on how exactly this toy is made and what is being put into the production. Your blog is exactly the track I want to be on in relation to what exactly is going into these toys. Do you mind directing me towards researches or websites to find more information? I have a call into Fisher Price, but after seeing they were in opposition to this bill, I’m not so sure anymore they will help me.
    Thank you!

    • Rachel Sarnoff says

      Hi Sara thanks for reaching out! The information here comes from the Center for Environmental Health–you can click the links to learn more about their campaign, and probably request more information there as well. Good luck!

  2. Thanks Rachel for sharing information about this petition. It is disturbing that Fisher Price who says that safety is their top priority would seek to limit information to parents who are simply looking for clear guidance about which products contain harmful flame retardant chemicals and which ones do not. Parents are currently “shopping int he dark” without the information they need to make an informed choice. Thanks to everyone for taking action. And if you would like to see our list of residential furniture that does not contain flame retardants, you can go to http://www.ceh.org/residential-furniture/

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